N4C Interclub Competition Division Definitions

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Preamble

The following holds for all Competition Divisions

The Northern California Council of Camera Clubs subscribes to the Ethics Statement of the Photographic Society of America. Consistent with that Ethics Statement, all images submitted for competition in both Print and Projected Image mediums, and in all Competition Divisions shall originate as photographs by the entrant on photographic emulsion or acquired digitally.

By virtue of submitting an entry, the photographer certifies the work as his/her own. No clip art, digital art or photographs other than those made by the entrant may be used in whole or in part in any portion of the image. Images may only be manipulated as noted in individual division definitions. When graphic elements other than photographs created by the entrant are used in an image, photographic content must still predominate.

Now that N4C is judging on a monitor rather than a projector, it is more imperative that members use the N4C standard resolution, a maximum of 1600 pixels in width and 1200 pixels in height so that the judges can better determine whether the focus is sharp.

 

Pictorial (P)

N4C has adopted the following definition for Pictorial (includes both color and “monochrome”)

Pictorial photography is the use of the photographic medium as an art form. The emphasis is on interest, visual impact, composition, and technical excellence. Images in the Pictorial division are not confined to any particular subject, type, or style of photography. Pictorial images may be manipulated in the darkroom, on the computer or in the camera in a manner consistent with the standards stated in the preamble to these definitions. The term Pictorial includes color and monochrome images.

A monochrome image refers to an image in black and white (grayscale), but also includes images made of tones of a single color. For example, sepia images, which display tones from light tan to dark brown, or cyanotype images (“blueprints”) are also monochrome.

Printed and Projected Pictorial Images

There are four Pictorial Projected competition levels: B = Basic, I = Intermediate, A = Advanced, M = Masters

There are four Pictorial Print competition levels: B = Basic, I = Intermediate, A = Advanced, M = Masters

Color Print entry labeling (in upper left corner): P/B, P/I, P/A, P/M

Monochrome Print entry labeling (in upper left corner): M/B, M/I, M/A, M/M

Examples of Pictorial Color Images


“Grand Prismatic Spring and Approaching Storm”
by Bob Fournier

“Sugar Shack”
by Ellie Webster

“Merganser In Gold”
by Ellie Webster

“Canola Field in Bloom”
by Bob Fournier

Examples of Pictorial Monochrome Images


“Leaf”
by Ellie Webster

 

Creative (C)

N4C has adopted the following definition for Creative

Creative photography is producing an image through the use of imaginative skill or originality of thought including the altering of reality. No image should be eliminated from competition simply because it looks realistic, provided it shows originality of concept.

Creative images may include modifications in the darkroom, on the computer, or in the camera, as well as unusual points of view, imaginative use of subject matter or lighting, or any other presentation that begins with the maker’s photograph or a collection of photographs.

All Creative images must be consistent with the standards stated in the preamble to these definitions. In Creative image competition the title is read when showing the image.

Printed and Projected Creative Images

There are four Creative Projected competition levels: B = Basic, I = Intermediate, A = Advanced, M = Masters

There are two Creative Print competition levels: B = Basic, A = Advanced

Creative Print entry labeling (in upper left corner): C/B or C/A

Examples of Creative Images


“Space Station and Red Planet”
by Bob Fournier

“Dreams Of Glory on Mechanical Bull”
by Bob Fournier

“Lookout World, Here I Come”
by Bob Fournier

 

Travel (T)

N4C has adopted the following definition for Travel

A Photo Travel image must express the feeling of a time and place, and portray a land, its distinctive features or culture in its natural state. There are no geographical limitations. Close-up pictures of people or objects must include distinguishable environment.

Techniques that add to, relocate, replace or remove any element of the original image, except by cropping are not permitted. All adjustments must appear natural. Conversion to monochrome is allowed.

The title should give the location and complement the travel story. All Travel images must be consistent with the standards stated in the preamble to these definitions.

Printed and Projected Travel Images

There are four Travel Projected competition levels: B = Basic, I = Intermediate, A = Advanced, M = Masters

There are two Travel Print competition levels: B = Basic, A = Advanced

Travel Print entry labeling (in upper left corner): T/B or T/A

Examples of Travel Images


“Hill Tribe Child Chaing Mai, Thailand”
by Ellie Webster

“Outrigger in Bora Bora, Tahiti”
by Ellie Webster

“Sheepherder – Tuscany”
by Bob Fournier

“Sydney Opera House and Ferry Boats”
by Bob Fournier

 

Journalism (J)

N4C has adopted the following definition for Journalism

Journalism entries shall consist of pictures with informative content and emotional impact, including human interest, documentary and spot news. The journalistic value of the photograph shall be considered over pictorial quality. In the interest of credibility, photographs which misrepresent the truth, such as manipulation of the image, or situations which are set up for the purpose of photography, are unacceptable in Journalism competition. The primary concern is to make story-telling and/or newsworthy photographs.

Sequences in Journalism are permitted and should show a chronology of events or tell a story.  A Print Journalism Sequence consists of a series of two or more related images and must have all images printed on the same sheet of paper, or matted in the same mat (composite of multiple-images-in-one). A Projected Journalism Sequence may have a series of up to four images, which count collectively as a single image, and unlike print sequences, no composite of multiple-images-in-one are allowed.

Techniques that add to, relocate, replace or remove any element of the original image, except by cropping are not permitted. All adjustments must appear natural. Conversion to monochrome is allowed.

In competition the title is read when showing the image. Good titles are important and should add to the photo-story. All Journalism images must be consistent with the standards stated in the preamble to these definitions.

Printed and Projected Journalism Images

There are four Journalism Projected competition levels: B = Basic, I = Intermediate, A = Advanced, M = Masters

There are two Journalism Print competition levels: B = Basic, A = Advanced

Journalism Print entry labeling (in upper left corner): J/B or J/A

Examples of Journalism Images


“Just Hanging on in Rugby Match”
by Bob Fournier

“Girl Hangs on The Win Mutton Ride”
by Bob Fournier

“Roller Coaster Ride”
by Bob Fournier

“Hair-Raising Turn in Barrel Race”
by Bob Fournier

 

Nature (N)

N4C has adopted the following definition for Nature

Nature photography is restricted to the use of the photographic process to depict all branches of natural history, except anthropology and archeology, in such a fashion that a well-informed person will be able to identify the subject material and certify its honest presentation. The informative and nature story telling value of a photograph must be weighed more than the pictorial quality, while maintaining high technical quality.

Images entered in the Nature division can have landscapes, geologic formations, weather phenomena, and extant organisms as the primary subject matter. This includes images taken with the subjects in controlled conditions, such as zoos, game farms, botanical gardens, aquariums and any enclosure where the subjects are totally dependent on man for food.

However, photographs of human created hybrid plants, cultivated plants, feral animals, domestic animals, or mounted specimens are ineligible. Also human elements shall not be present in the image and are ineligible except: in situations where wild animals have been tagged with scientific bands, tags or radio collars; in situations where nature subjects (e.g. barn owls, storks, eagles etc.) have adapted to an environment modified by humans, and these human elements are an integral part of the nature story; or where those human elements are in situations depicting natural forces, like hurricanes or tidal waves.

Any form of manipulation that alters the truth of the photographic statement is not permitted. This includes techniques that add, relocate, replace, or remove pictorial elements except by cropping. Infrared images (either direct-captures or derivations), are not permitted and are ineligible.

Techniques that enhance the presentation of the photograph without changing the nature story or the pictorial content, or without altering the content of the original scene, are permitted including HDR, focus stacking and dodging/burning. Techniques that remove elements added by the camera, such as dust spots, digital noise, and film scratches, are allowed. Stitching is allowed to complete the natural image. All allowed adjustments must appear natural. Color images can be converted to grey-scale monochrome.

Sequences in Nature are permitted and should show a chronology of events or tell a story. A Print Nature Sequence consist of a series of two or more related images and must have all images printed on the same sheet of paper, or matted in the same mat (composite of multiple-images-in-one). A Projected Nature Sequence may have a series of up to four images, which count collectively as a single image, and unlike print sequences, in projected images, no composite of multiple-images-in-one are allowed.

In Nature competition the title should be factual and descriptive and should be read when showing the image. Scientific names are encouraged but are not required. All Nature images must be consistent with the standards stated in the preamble to these definitions.

Printed and Projected Nature Images

There are four Nature (and Nature Authentic Wildlife) Projected competition levels: B = Basic, I = Intermediate, A = Advanced, M = Masters

There are two Nature Print competition levels: B = Basic, A = Advanced

Nature Print entry labeling (in upper left corner): N/B or N/A

Examples of Nature Images


“Elephants in the Masai River, Kenya”
by Ellie Webster

“Reticulated Giraffe Portrait”
by Ellie Webster

“Lioness Feeding Cubs, Kenya”
by Ellie Webster

“Grizzly Catches Salmon, Katmai NP”
by Ellie Webster

 

Nature Sub-Division: Authentic Wildlife (W)

Authentic Wildlife applies to Projected Images ONLY.

N4C has adopted the following definition for Authentic Wildlife

Authentic Wildlife is defined as one or more extant zoological or botanical organisms free and unrestrained in a natural or adopted habitat. Landscapes, geologic formations, photographs of zoo or game farm animals, or of any extant zoological or botanical species taken under controlled conditions, are not eligible. Wildlife is not limited to animals, birds and insects. Marine subjects and botanical subjects (including fungi and algae) taken in the wild are suitable wildlife subjects, as are carcasses of extant species.

Examples of Authentic Wildlife Images


“Hyena with Cubs Serengeti NP”
by Ellie Webster

“Purple Gallinule Everglades FL”
by Ellie Webster

 

Sequence (S)

N4C has adopted the following definition for Sequence

A sequence consists of a series of related images. A Sequence print must have two or more related images all printed on the same sheet of paper, or matted in the same mat. A projected image Sequence is only permitted in the Nature and Journalism divisions, and is comprised of two to four related images, which count collectively as one entry.

All Sequence images must be consistent with the standards stated in the preamble to these definitions.

Printed Sequence Images

There is only one Sequence Print competition level:  it is denoted A = All

Sequence Print entry labeling (in upper left corner): S/A

Example of Print Sequence Image


“Raider Fans”
by Jane Postiglione

 

Last Modified November 2015